Popping-in?

We designed our studio; it's filled with light and music. There are multiple meeting rooms, a well stocked kitchen, and an indoor garden (with fishpond). Pop-in for tea and stay to use a spare desk for as long as you need.

11 Greenwich Centre Business Park,
53 Norman Road, Greenwich
London SE10 9QF

Public transport

We’re next to Greenwich train and DLR station. We have a door right on the concourse but it’s different to our postal address.

From Greenwich rail platform

This video shows the route to take from the train that will arrive at Greenwich rail station from London Bridge.

From Greenwich DLR station

This video shows the route to take from the DLR that will arrive at Greenwich DLR station from Bank.

By car

If you have to come by car, we have a couple of parking spaces in front of our studio. Call ahead to make sure they’re free, and use our postcode (SE10 9QF) to guide you in.

Get in touch

We’d love to hear from you. Use whichever medium works best for you.

11 Greenwich Centre Business Park,
53 Norman Road, Greenwich
London SE10 9QF

New project enquiry

It's exciting to chat about potential new projects. We don't have a ‘sales’ team or a form to fill in. Call us or give us a little detail via email and we'll get straight back to you.

enquiry@cogdesign.com

Website support

If you're a client then you'll be best served by calling us or contacting us via Basecamp, otherwise you can use this dedicated email that reaches all of the digital team.

digital@cogdesign.com

Finance questions

This email hits the inboxes of the people who deal with our bookkeeping and finances.

accounts@cogdesign.com

Just want a chat?

Sometimes enquiries don't fall neatly under a heading, do they?

hello@cogdesign.com

Cultural Calendar

A round-up of recommendations and reviews, sent on the first Friday of each month, topped-off with a commissioned image from a talented new illustrator. Sign-up and tell your friends.

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Cog News

An irregular update of activity from our studio. Showing off about great new projects, announcements, job opportunities, that sort of thing. Sign-up and tell your friends.

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Walter Isaacson at the Royal Institution

Walter Isaacson at the Royal Institution

In the room where the Victorians explained and codified science, the Science Museum Director Roger Highfield chatted with Walter Isaacson, the biographer of Steve Jobs.

We were in the room where Faraday explained the correlation between electricity and magnetism, where Priestly isolated his exploding air (later named Oxygen), and where Rutherford explained the atom.

Today in that room was the biographer of both Albert Einstein and, subject of tonight’s talk, Steve Jobs. And, in the audience was Jimmy Wales, the co-founder of Wikipedia.

Walter Isaacson spoke (without notes) for the first half of the evening, telling tales from Jobs’ life and giving insights into the man. He spoke of how Jobs had no problem being described as Mercurial and how he used to mesmerise people into doing what he wanted, staring into their eyes and saying ‘don’t be afraid, you can do it’.

We were in the room where Faraday explained the correlation between electricity and magnetism, where Priestly isolated his exploding air (later named Oxygen), and where Rutherford explained the atom.

Today in that room was the biographer of both Albert Einstein and, subject of tonight’s talk, Steve Jobs. And, in the audience was Jimmy Wales, the co-founder of Wikipedia.

Walter Isaacson spoke (without notes) for the first half of the evening, telling tales from Jobs’ life and giving insights into the man. He spoke of how Jobs had no problem being described as Mercurial and how he used to mesmerise people into doing what he wanted, staring into their eyes and saying ‘don’t be afraid, you can do it’.

In the second half he was joined by Roger Highfield. In conversation (and via questions from the audience), Isaacson spoke more about Jobs’ vulnerabilities. He spoke of the pain he felt when first being ousted from Apple by people he regarded as father-figures. He talked of the obsessive perfectionism that destroyed the Next computer company but ultimately led to the successes of Apple, and how he changed his mantra to ‘great artists ship’.

Asked if he thought that Jobs was a genius who would be remembered, Isaacson was careful to explain that Jobs was a visionary, his focus was on the perfection of the user experience, paring it down to the essentials and making them beautiful, marrying product and software in a way that others would never think of. Isaacson was irritated by Macolm Gladwell’s obituary of Jobs, where he described him as a ‘tweaker’, but he was more cross about the word than the sentiment.

We were in the room where Faraday explained the correlation between electricity and magnetism, where Priestly isolated his exploding air (later named Oxygen), and where Rutherford explained the atom.
michael@cogdesign.com

We may have been in a venerable British institution but the night was all about the Americans. Walter Isaacson was a professional in the way only Americans seem to be – prepared, affable, charming, erudite, funny. He spoke about a man who continued the traditions of Edison and Ford, spotting opportunities and refining processes to create a world-beating company. And in the audience was Jimmy Wales, a man who has defined the internet age and the US dominance of the web, occasionally engaging with the real world but mostly fiddling with his iPhone and iPad.