Popping-in?

We designed our studio; it's filled with light and music. There are multiple meeting rooms, a well stocked kitchen, and an indoor garden (with fishpond). Pop-in for tea and stay to use a spare desk for as long as you need.

11 Greenwich Centre Business Park,
53 Norman Road, Greenwich
London SE10 9QF

Public transport

We’re next to Greenwich train and DLR station. We have a door right on the concourse but it’s different to our postal address.

From Greenwich rail platform

This video shows the route to take from the train that will arrive at Greenwich rail station from London Bridge.

From Greenwich DLR station

This video shows the route to take from the DLR that will arrive at Greenwich DLR station from Bank.

By car

If you have to come by car, we have a couple of parking spaces in front of our studio. Call ahead to make sure they’re free, and use our postcode (SE10 9QF) to guide you in.

Get in touch

We’d love to hear from you. Use whichever medium works best for you.

11 Greenwich Centre Business Park,
53 Norman Road, Greenwich
London SE10 9QF

New project enquiry

It's exciting to chat about potential new projects. We don't have a ‘sales’ team or a form to fill in. Call us or give us a little detail via email and we'll get straight back to you.

enquiry@cogdesign.com

Website support

If you're a client then you'll be best served by calling us or contacting us via Basecamp, otherwise you can use this dedicated email that reaches all of the digital team.

digital@cogdesign.com

Finance questions

This email hits the inboxes of the people who deal with our bookkeeping and finances.

accounts@cogdesign.com

Just want a chat?

Sometimes enquiries don't fall neatly under a heading, do they?

hello@cogdesign.com

Cultural Calendar

A round-up of recommendations and reviews, sent on the first Friday of each month, topped-off with a commissioned image from a talented new illustrator. Sign-up and tell your friends.

Sign me up Cultural Calendar

Cog News

An irregular update of activity from our studio. Showing off about great new projects, announcements, job opportunities, that sort of thing. Sign-up and tell your friends.

Sign me up Cog News

Iconoclasts and Sacred Cows, an NCA debate

Iconoclasts and Sacred Cows, an NCA debate

A debate about censorship that promised to push buttons and boundaries, with Rt Rev James Jones, Grayson Perry, Professor Frank Furedi and Kate Adie.

I was vaguely aware of the organisation, National Campaign for the Arts before this evening. They’d been a powerful membership organisation, lobbying for public sector funding for culture. So I was excited by this event, chaired by their Chair, Kate Adie.

The topic was taste and self-sensorship.

Left to right: Grayson Perry (dressed as Claire), Rt Rev James Jones, Kate Adie and Professor Frank Furedi. Left to right: Grayson Perry (dressed as Claire), Rt Rev James Jones, Kate Adie and Professor Frank Furedi.

On the sofas with Kate Adie were Rt Rev James Jones (Bishop of Liverpool), Grayson Perry (dressed as Claire) and Professor Frank Furedi (Professor of Sociology at Kent University).

The subject promised a broad look at the beautiful and moving, through to the shocking, distasteful and disturbing.

The less than half full hall was perhaps not too big a surprise. An academic debate on a Monday night, with a £9.50 entry fee wasn’t an enticing prospect for many.

The boundaries of taste have been pushed a long way in the past half century or so. And with a Bishop, a transvestite potter, a far-left academic and a war correspondent in the mix, the stage looked set for a lively debate of opinions and objections.

The reality was actually very different.

The was an almost immediate consensus: tackling of uncomfortable subject matter can only be a positive development within society, helping pose questions that would otherwise remain unanswered.

Quickly the subject veered more towards social commentary than an exploration of the arts, though the odd nod was made back in the direction.

The consensus and generally affable nature of the panelists could have been irritating if they hadn’t each been so entertaining in their own ways.

Some fascinating questions and observations were made and the evening proved an insightful, eye-opening and sometimes humorous look at a subject where we are all quick to take sides.

Perhaps the most controversial views of the panel came from Frank Furedi who lambasted the emerging trends of de-platforming and dichotomy of liberals calling for free speech whilst censoring historic racial language in academic literature. I’m not sure anyone was buying it but it did make for an interesting note of conflict.

The evening warmed me to the National Campaign for the Arts and made me determined to do more to lobby for funding for the arts.